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11th October 2018

Aktuálně

Boris Klepal

The new Chief Conductor of the Czech Philharmonic Semyon Bychkov introduced himself as a master builder of grand symphonic structures at yesterday’s opening concert of his first season.  Under his baton, Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 was dazzling in all of its complexities…  The orchestra, however, played with a beautiful richness of sound that maintained its vivid colours even at the quietest moments.  In the Rudolfinum, the dynamic climaxes made the sensation of an impenetrable wall of sound, but in which the details were not lost.  The conductor Semyon Bychkov built his performance on a foundation of balanced, refined sound and subtle handling of dynamics – and not on empty effects.  When the dynamic climaxes arrived, however, they were sonic eruptions…  Semyon Bychkov introduced himself in the role of Chief Conductor as a master builder of grand symphonic structures, and the extreme dimensions of the work gave him the opportunity to communicate everything that was essential – in this case a message about death and resurrection – in a stirring manner.

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4th October 2018

OperaPlus

Cross Marcell

The hall first resounded with the overture to Smetana’s opera The Bartered Bride, followed by three dances from the same opera: Polka, Furiant, and Skočná.  The conductor Semyon Bychkov accentuated the sharpness and brilliance Smetana’s orchestration, chose moderate tempos, and emphasized the excellence of the orchestra’s ensemble playing.

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4th October 2018

Novinky

Vladimír Říha

Although the opening concert of the Czech Philharmonic’s new season is still a week away, the orchestra’s new Chief Conductor and Music Director Semyon Bychkov already introduced himself for the first time in that position on Wednesday in the completely packed Dvořák Hall at the Rudolfinum.  The concert for the 100th anniversary of the founding of Czechoslovakia was the best opportunity to show how the foreign chief conductor ‒ a native of Russia who emigrated to the West in 1975 ‒ will fare in the Czech repertoire for which the Czech Philharmonic is primarily known.  The public’s enthusiasm and the encores then showed that Bychkov is also “at home” interpreting Czech classics, which represent the core of the orchestra’s repertoire.  He performed the works by Bedřich Smetana, Antonín Dvořák, and Bohuslav Martinů that followed the Czech national anthem with reverence but still in his own way, and the result was remarkable…  The highpoint of the evening was the New World Symphony by Dvořák, which Bychkov knows best, understandably, and conducts frequently around the world.  Under his hands, the orchestra gave a perfect performance of this rigorously structured work.  Especially deserving of mention were the outstanding solos by the English horn, flute, and clarinet players

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4th October 2018

KlasikaPlus

Petr Veber

Semyon Bychkov, conducting from memory [in Dvořák’s Ninth Symphony], gave the more tender, poetic, slower passages a beautifully hushed quality, and through romantic gradations of tempo, he gave an emotionally satisfying reading of the music with lovely countermelodies and carefully shaped details…   Of the three items on the evening’s programme, it was the Double Concerto [by Martinů] that came off the best and the most powerfully for Semyon Bychkov.  The strings of the orchestra were divided physically into two camps standing visibly opposed to each other, and they played with great commitment and intensity, the pianist Ivo Kahánek added a fiery approach with devotion to the music to the overall sound, and above them the timpanist Michael Kroutil dominated the stage…  This, of course, does not change the fact that the intimately familiar, joyous music [in Smetana’s The Bartered Bride Overture] had reliably just the right energy, inducing patriotic and purely personal, pleasant emotions, and that at the beginning of the evening it served its positive, celebratory purpose.

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